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Abstract

Hospital systems interested in improving patient experience and physician engagement may look to physician communication skills training (CST) as a means of improving both. This study examines a 7.5-hour, multi-specialty, hospital-wide physician CST workshop in a large academic hospital system and its effects on participants’ self-efficacy, attitudes, and behaviors related to communicating with patients. Data was gathered from October 2014 through June 2016 through a web-based questionnaire sent to participants 6-weeks post-workshop which focused on skills taught in the course, attitudes toward communication training, and provider behaviors when communicating with patients. Along with demographic questions, a ten question retrospective pre-post format was used with a 5-point scale for the domains measured. Retrospective pre-post methodology may provide a more accurate assessment of a learners’ self-assessment of skills acquisition. A paired t-test was used to examine changes in participants’ self-efficacy, attitudes, and behaviors toward communicating with patients prior to and 6-weeks post-workshop. Linear regression was used to determine if there were any covariates that explained these changes. A total of 161 responses from 490 participants (21 medical specialties) were collected for a response rate of 32.8%. In 9 out of 10 domains measured, a significant change in self-efficacy, attitudes, and behaviors related to communicating with patients occurred (p<. 05). There was no significant change in perceived time management/efficiency during visits. Our conclusion is that a 7.5 hour hospital-wide, multi-specialty physician CST can be effective in improving participants’ self-efficacy, attitudes, and behaviors toward communicating with patients.

First Page

48

Last Page

54